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One of the most influential artists of the 20th century, Don’t Blink is a documentary about Robert Frank, the legendary photographer and filmmaker behind the seminal book The Americans and landmark films like Pull My Daisy (with Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg) and C***sucker Blues (with the Rolling Stones). Directed by his longtime editor Laura Israel, the film is an exuberant and fascinating journey into the images and words of an iconoclastic artist, a Swiss-born man who reinvented himself the American way, and is still standing on ground of his own making at the age of 90. The soundtrack features Lou Reed, Bob Dylan, Rolling Stones, White Stripes, Yo La Tengo, Tom Waits, and more.

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The movie-going experience has always been there for us..but will that always be the case? Laemmle Theatres, the beloved 84-year-old arthouse cinema chain in Los Angeles with deep ties to the history of Hollywood, is facing seismic change and downward pressure. Yet the family behind this multigenerational business – whose sole mission has been to support the art of film – is determined to see it survive. In this dark time for in-theater arthouse cinema in America, director Raphael Sbarge’s ONLY IN THEATERS about the history and current state of the Laemmle Theatre chain is an important opportunity for reflection, nostalgia, gathering as a community, and forging a new path forward. 

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Making movies is hard. In rehab, it’s impossible.

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BAD AXE captures a closely knit Cambodian Mexican American family living in a rural Michigan community as they now fight to keep their American dream alive. As owners of a local prominent restaurant, they reckon with a global pandemic, racial tensions, and generational scars from Cambodia’s “killing fields.”

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An immersive journey through the New York music scene of the early 2000s. A new generation kick-started a musical rebirth for NYC that reverberated around the world.

Featuring The Strokes, Yeah Yeah Yeah’s, LCD Soundsystem, The Moldy Peaches and more, Directed by Dylan Southern & Will Lovelace (Shut Up and Play the Hits) based on the best selling book by author Lizzy Goodman

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Dubbed “King Tiger” and “the Malcolm X of the Chicano Movement,” Reies López Tijerina inspired Mexican-American college students of the late 1960s and early 1970s to start the Chicano Civil Rights Movement that stressed ethnic pride, ethnic studies, and opposition to police brutality. The Chicano movement eventually faded away, and everyone thought the same of Tijerina. People speak of him as a saint, an illuminated man, a man looking for a fair cause through violence…but at the time of the production of this film, King Tiger was alive, living in Mexico, and wanting to tell his story.

Tijerina was a Mexican-American radical and civil rights activist who led a land-grant movement in northern New Mexico from 1956 to 1976. He organized hundreds of Chicanos to demand repatriation of land confiscated by Anglo surveyors.

In June of 1967, the court of Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico, was assaulted by armed men under Tijerina’s command. The outcome resulted in the largest manhunt in the recent history of the United States. They Called Me King Tiger attempts to offer a balanced view of Reies López Tijerina, with testimonials from Tijerina’s relatives, activists, academics, and policemen who participated in the Tierra Amarilla event.

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